Update your Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) or (Permanent / Derivative) Residence Card to be in your new name

If you hold a Biometric Residence Permit (BRP), you’ll need to update it (to be in your new name) within 3 months of changing your name, or else you may be fined up to £ 1,000 or have your stay shortened.

If you hold a Residence Card, Permanent Residence Card or Derivative Residence Card because you’re an EEA / Swiss national or their family member or extended family member, you can also apply for a new card in your new name.

If you’re not an Irish / EEA / Swiss national (who won’t need a BRP) or an (extended) family member, and you haven’t got a BRP already, you’ll get one when you apply —

  • for a U.K. visa to come to the U.K. for longer than 6 months
  • to replace a U.K. visa or extend it to longer than 6 months
  • to transfer a U.K. visa to your new passport
  • for “limited leave to remain” in the U.K. which adds up to more than 6 months’ leave in total
  • for “indefinite leave to remain” in the U.K. (leave to “settle” in the U.K.)
  • to be recognised as a refugee / someone in need of humanitarian protection / a stateless person
  • for a Convention Travel Document
  • for a Stateless Person’s Travel Document
  • for a Certificate of Travel
  • as a dependant of someone who’s applying for a BRP

Update your passport / EEA identity card first

The Home Office will only issue your BRP / Residence Card in the same name as on your passport or EEA identity card.  If you want to change your BRP / Residence Card to be in your new name, the Home Office will expect you to update your passport / EEA identity card to be in your new name first (before you make your application).

However, you can use a different name on your BRP / Residence Card — from what’s on your passport / EEA identity card — if (and only if) —

  • you’re a recognised refugee or stateless person
  • you’ve been granted humanitarian protection
  • you’d be at risk of harm unless your name is changed, e.g. due to you being a victim of crime (such as domestic violence) or a vulnerable witness
  • you’re a transgender person whose country of origin doesn’t recognise changes to your name and / or gender
  • there are other exceptional circumstances that would seriously and adversely affect your life in the U.K. unless your name is changed

If one of these conditions applies to you, you can change your name (by deed poll) and update your BRP / Residence Card to be in your new name.

If you hold a BRP, you’ll need to update it within 3 months of changing your name, or else you may be fined up to £ 1,000 or have your stay shortened.  Otherwise, you cannot apply for a deed poll to change your name, because you won’t be able to update your BRP — and you’ll risk being fined up to £ 1,000 or having your stay shortened.

How to apply for your new BRP or Residence Card

In all cases, you’ll need to update your passport / EEA identity card before your BRP or Residence Card — unless an exception applies (see above).

If you’ve got “limited leave to remain” (permission to stay in the U.K. temporarily)

You’ll need to apply for a new Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) using form TOC ↗ (for a “Transfer of Conditions”).
This costs £ 223.

Fill out the form using your new name (in sections 1.41.5), and write your old name in section 1.6.

You’ll need to send in your original deed poll with the completed application form.

You can include your partner (even if you aren’t married) and any children under 18 on the same application form, but you’ll need to pay the same fee for each person.  You (and any dependents included on the form) need to be in the U.K. to apply.

If you’ve got “indefinite leave to remain” (permission to “settle” in the U.K.)

You’ll need to apply for a new Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) using form NTL ↗ (for a “No Time Limit” stamp).
This costs £ 308.

Fill out the form using your new name (in sections 1.41.5), and write your old name in section 1.6.

You’ll need to send in your original deed poll with the completed application form.

You can include your partner (even if you aren’t married) and any children under 18 on the same application form, but you’ll need to pay the same fee for each person.  You (and any dependents included on the form) need to be in the U.K. to apply.

If you’ve got the “permanent right of residence” in the U.K. under EEA regulations (also called “permanent residence”)

You’ll need to apply for a new Permanent Residence Card using form EEA(PR) ↗.
This costs £ 65.

If you’re not an EEA / Swiss national, your Permanent Residence Card will be in the “biometric format” and will contain your biometric information.

Fill out the form using your new name (in part 1 (“your personal details”) of the “biometric information” section; and in sections 1.31.4), and write your old name in section 1.5.

You’ll need to send in your original deed poll with the completed application form.

You cannot include anyone else on the same application form.  If there are other family members of the relevant EEA / Swiss national, you’ll need to fill out a form for each person (and pay the same fee).

If you’ve got the “right of residence” in the U.K. as a family member (or extended family member) of an EEA / Swiss national who is exercising Treaty rights in the U.K. (and you haven’t got the “permanent right of residence”)

You’ll need to apply for a new Residence Card using —

  • form EEA(FM) ↗ if you’re a “family member”, which includes —
    • the spouse or civil partner of the relevant EEA / Swiss national
    • a dependent child of the relevant EEA / Swiss national (or of their spouse / civil partner)
    • a child or grandchild of the relevant EEA / Swiss national (or of their spouse / civil partner) who is either dependent or aged under 21 (but not if the relevant EEA / Swiss national only has a right to reside in the U.K. as a student)
    • a dependent parent or grandparent of the relevant EEA / Swiss national (or of their spouse / civil partner) (but not if the relevant EEA / Swiss national only has a right to reside in the U.K. as a student)
  • form EEA(EFM) ↗ if you’re an “extended family member”, which includes —
    • the unmarried partner of the relevant EEA / Swiss national
    • someone related to the relevant EEA / Swiss national in another way (e.g. if you’re their brother, sister, aunt, uncle, cousin, nephew, or niece)

This costs £ 65.

If you’re not an EEA / Swiss national, your Residence Card will be in the “biometric format” and will contain your biometric information.

Fill out the form using your new name (in part 1 (“your personal details”) of the “biometric information” section; and in sections 1.31.4), and write your old name in section 1.5.

You’ll need to send in your original deed poll with the completed application form.

You cannot include anyone else on the same application form.  If there are other extended family members of the relevant EEA / Swiss national, you’ll need to fill out a form for each person (and pay the same fee).

If you’ve got a “derivative right of residence” in the U.K. due to a relationship with an EEA / Swiss national who is exercising Treaty rights in the U.K. (and you haven’t got the “permanent right of residence”)

You’ll need to apply for a new Derivative Residence Card using form DRF1 ↗ if you’re —

  • the primary carer of a British citizen child or dependent adult (a ‘Zambrano’ case ↗),
  • the primary carer of a self-sufficient EEA / Swiss national child (a ‘Chen’ case ↗)
  • the child of an EEA / Swiss national former worker where the child is in education in the U.K. (an ‘Ibrahim/Teixeira’ case ↗)
  • the primary carer of a child of an EEA / Swiss national former worker where the child is in education in the U.K. (an ‘Ibrahim/Teixeira’ case)
  • the dependent child aged under 18 of a primary carer in one of the categories above

This costs £ 65.

If you’re not an EEA / Swiss national, your Residence Card will be in the “biometric format” and will contain your biometric information.

Fill out the form using your new name (in part 1 (“your personal details”) of the “biometric information” section; and in sections 1.31.4), and write your old name in section 1.5.

You’ll need to send in your original deed poll with the completed application form.

You cannot include anyone else on the same application form.  If there are other extended family members of the relevant EEA / Swiss national, you’ll need to fill out a form for each person (and pay the same fee).

Applying for your BRP in person (the premium service)

The premium service is only available if you have limited or indefinite leave to remain and you want to apply for a new BRP.

Instead of applying by post, you can apply in person for your new BRP at a premium service centre ↗.  This costs an extra £ 500 for each person included on the application form.

You’ll need to find the centre nearest to you ↗ and book an appointment ↗ before you go.

Your new BRP won’t be issued on the day itself — it’ll be posted to you within 7 working days.

Some people cannot apply through the premium service ↗.

What it costs

Your immigration status Form Apply
by post
Apply
in person
limited leave to remain TOC (Transfer of Conditions) £ 223 £ 723
indefinite leave to remain (“settle”) NTL (No Time Limit stamp) £ 308 £ 808
permanent right of residence EEA(PR) £ 65 not possible
right of residence EEA(FM) — family members
EEA(EFM) — extended family members
£ 65 not possible
derivative right of residence DRF1 £ 65 not possible

Each person applying has to pay the full price.  There’s no discount for children, nor for family members when applying on the same form.